Caroline and Photos

This week, I’ve been sewing bits and pieces of a lot of projects, so guess what I finished?  Right, not much.  But I did finish Block #20, Caroline, from the Farmer’s Wife sew along ( #fqs1930sfarmerswife ).  The contrast of this block turned out well, although is two out of three metallic fabrics too much? I also think I should use orange in my next FW block, I’ve done two with pink and yellow.

Caroline, Farmer's Wife 1930s Block #20

Caroline, Farmer’s Wife 1930s Block #20

I took the opportunity of photographing this block to play with some lighting, and different backgrounds, the first photo above is simply on my white cutting table.  (A big thank you to Katy at The Littlest Thistle for the photography tutorials she has been running this year).  My sewing room has daylight fluorescent bulbs, which are really nice to sew under, and not bad for photographs either, and this year I added a desk light with a daylight bulb, to help when I’m free motion quilting, so I used it too.

My photo setup today

My photo setup today

To tell you the truth, I’m not 100% happy with any of these.  I would like them to be a lot brighter, without retouching.  But it was interesting to try different colours in the background (including the one with Kona coal which isn’t quite in focus.

on the cutting mat

on the cutting mat

Kona coal

Kona coal

Kona orchid

Kona orchid

Another challenge with my photography is focusing.  When using my regular glasses and manual focus, the photo looks in focus, but once I put it on the computer it is not.  I have been wondering if I should be using my reading glasses?  I took 50 photos of this red-bellied woodpecker (unusual for our area) through the window, and only two were somewhat in focus.  In the rest, the redbud tree in the background is the focal point.

Red Bellied woodpecker

Red Bellied woodpecker

Linking up to Katy and to Angie at Gnomeangel.

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4 comments

  1. It’s interesting how much difference the background makes. My first photos were just on my green cutting mat, and were really awful! What did you use to filter the light in your second photo?

    1. Hah, that’s just a piece of tracing paper (actually a pattern piece I had lying around). I needed to eliminate the “spotlight” effect I was getting from the lamp and the paper did the trick.

      I find the cutting mat really changes up the colours in my photos! I have a piece of foam core I often use as a background too.

  2. thelittlestthistle · ·

    Ah, now I may be able to help you with the background – if you would like it to be brighter, you may need to use what’s called exposure compensation. If you’re in Aperture or Shutter Priority or even Program mode, there should be an option to allow you to increase the compensation, which means that you let in more light than is strictly needed. In manual mode, it’s known as ‘shooting to the right’, in that instead of getting the little meter in the viewfinder to be in the middle, you change your settings so that it’s more to the right, that will make your whites much whiter :o)

    1. Thanks Katy, that’s a good mnemonic for me! I’ll give it a try.

      On Sun, Nov 1, 2015 at 6:56 PM, Lisa in Port Hope wrote:

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